injectadeck - Thoughts and Experiences

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Ah, gentlemen of quick persuasion: YouTube has taught me everything I know, from the fingerings of Django Reinhardt to the arguments of Noam Chomsky, the repair of my gas clothes dryer, leaking dishwasher surfactant chamber and diesel engine injectors, as well as revealing European procedures for the thermite welding of railroad tracks and just exactly how a Russian lawyer bushcrafts his cabin in the woods.

I am much the better for it, and considerably more informed about the Battle of Midway than ever before.
 

bigd14

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
When you do an area that size do you have to worry about losing camber across the deck?
Yes, there was significant deck camber. I preserved the center line of fiberglass between the non-skid areas along the entire length of the deck to maintain a reference point.

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bigd14

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
glue the fiberglass layer again,
You may find that some of the fiberglass won't come off cleanly. Or if it does it means you haven't removed enough area to get back to solid core. I did a similar job from underneath on the side decks but used 1/2 inch balsa core material from Jamestown Distributors along with 1/2 G10 plates under deck fittings. As boat projects go it was technically easy, but quite messy. Line everything with plastic.

 

Mr. Scarlett

Member III
Yes, PPE and protecting the interior are very important. Having done this I don't envy you one bit.
I also used balsa since it seemed to have held up for at least 40 years. Mapping out each area with a 1/8" drill bit and a Sharpie. As mentioned above, it's doable but messy. I wouldn't get too hung up on saving the old skin, this could be a great time to learn about vacuum bagging. If you can do it upside down, you can do it anywhere!

I have no experience with injectadeck other than videos lamenting its use when it comes time to do the job over with a solid core. As far as expanding foam goes, again no experience but it seems to me that one could end up with a bigger project than what they started with if they weren't careful. If I had to do it again I'd use balsa, (there's a chance the right person could talk me into foam), and perhaps plywood or G10 in a few strategic places.

Mind you these are just opinions, I'm sure there's any number of cases where the alternatives have worked out just fine. Good luck!
 

gargrag

Member II
Yes, PPE and protecting the interior are very important. Having done this I don't envy you one bit.
I also used balsa since it seemed to have held up for at least 40 years. Mapping out each area with a 1/8" drill bit and a Sharpie. As mentioned above, it's doable but messy. I wouldn't get too hung up on saving the old skin, this could be a great time to learn about vacuum bagging. If you can do it upside down, you can do it anywhere!

I have no experience with injectadeck other than videos lamenting its use when it comes time to do the job over with a solid core. As far as expanding foam goes, again no experience but it seems to me that one could end up with a bigger project than what they started with if they weren't careful. If I had to do it again I'd use balsa, (there's a chance the right person could talk me into foam), and perhaps plywood or G10 in a few strategic places.

Mind you these are just opinions, I'm sure there's any number of cases where the alternatives have worked out just fine. Good luck!

any material on how to approach core replacement woth vacuum bagging from the inside?
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
I used vacuum bagging on my port side repair, but decided not to use it on the starboard side. Vacuum bagging requires a perfect seal for it to work and you can only achieve that by sealing against the top skin (assuming you are going from below). If you try to seal against the bottom skin, the air will travel through the good core and escape through the staple holes. On the port side, I installed the bulk of the new core with vacuum, then filled in the space between the new core and old core using extendable drywall sanding poles to push up. At the end of the day, our boats aren't super light racers, so a little extra resin between the outer skin and new core isn't going to hurt anything. Here's a some more detail on my experience:

 

gargrag

Member II
I used vacuum bagging on my port side repair, but decided not to use it on the starboard side. Vacuum bagging requires a perfect seal for it to work and you can only achieve that by sealing against the top skin (assuming you are going from below). If you try to seal against the bottom skin, the air will travel through the good core and escape through the staple holes. On the port side, I installed the bulk of the new core with vacuum, then filled in the space between the new core and old core using extendable drywall sanding poles to push up. At the end of the day, our boats aren't super light racers, so a little extra resin between the outer skin and new core isn't going to hurt anything. Here's a some more detail on my experience:

yo convinced me to go with the proper repair.

I think. I'll plan for the end of the season, @trickdhat did you do this repair with the boat on the water and the mast stepped?
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
yo convinced me to go with the proper repair.

I think. I'll plan for the end of the season, @trickdhat did you do this repair with the boat on the water and the mast stepped?
Yes, I cut into the laminate while it was on the hard, but the rest of the job was in the water. The Mast was up the whole time.
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
I purchase most of my supplies from these guys:


They are local to me, but it's actual cheaper to ship than it is to drive and they're only 45 minutes Away. They also offer classes, so they're really helpful.
 
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