***Converting 32-2 from Diesel to ALL ELECTRIC?***

Dagny

Member I
Why don't we see any Hybrid solutions for boats? Range anxiety is real and there are no quick charge stations on the water that I know of. Although I can count them on one hand, there were times when my motor saved me from near disaster and a lot of undue discomfort. I would love the comfort of electric but require the range and reliability of my diesel for peace of mind.
I've wondered the same thing, Grant. Nice to hear back from another Ericson owner from the Bay Area!
 

Dagny

Member I
For a thorough understanding of electric power for sailboats I don't think there is a better source than "Sailing Uma."

They started years ago, and went through homemade solutions, sail drive issues, and eventual sponsorship for their current setup.

They are rational and honest about the tradeoffs and challenges. It would take a while to follow their video experience, but anybody considering electric would profit from the time spent. Here's one of their videos:

Thanks! I've been watching their channel for a while. Some good info there!
 

Solarken

Member III
Why don't we see any Hybrid solutions for boats? Range anxiety is real and there are no quick charge stations on the water that I know of. Although I can count them on one hand, there were times when my motor saved me from near disaster and a lot of undue discomfort. I would love the comfort of electric but require the range and reliability of my diesel for peace of mind.
I’ve used mine hybrid as mentioned. Just have not done a built in self starting generator. I’m looking at that though. Future testing will provide data for me to build this option.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Cars are a bad analogy, but we have a 2017 Prius Prime (plug-in) hybrid. It goes 25 miles or more on battery alone, then gets 50 mpg on its gas engine. It charges overnight (in a few hours if not fully discharged). My wife, whose daily round trip is 12 miles, fills her gasoline tank once or twice a year.

The 2024 new Prius Prime has a full body redesign and numerous upgrades, and even better battery-only range.

Want to drive one in California? You can't, there are no demos available at any dealer. There are no 2024 Prius Primes on any car lot. To buy this car, which to my mind is the answer to transitional electric power, you order it unseen, and pay a premium. At Santa Monica Toyota, one of the largest dealers, the price added to the sticker is $5,000.

Dealers cannot or will not explain this oddity. The memorized response to "why?" is, "No cars available to test drive because every car that arrives is already owned."

Toyota was a pioneer in this sort of hybrid--a hefty daily range, with a small gas engine for long trips. At first, the company stuck to its guns, saying this was a better answer at present than all-electric, since the grid system is incomplete. Then last year they began to hedge. Now they push all-electric, although Toyota models are limited compared to other big manufacturers like Ford or the Europeans.

So what happened? Pressure of incentives, tooling and long-range production plans have put the Prime in the back seat, despite high demand.

So the world heads Tesla--or towards the all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5, an effective competitor for those suffering from Long Elonitis.

An all-electric car future is OK by me. But hybrid, when mass produced (I don't see it for yachts) is a good solution for the present.
 

steven

Sustaining Member
re genset charges battery hybrid. I cannot find reliable information on how fast the batteries can actually be re-charged. As far as I can tell charging faster than manufacturer rating will reduce battery life. Maybe that not so bad. I don't need 3000 re-charges. Maybe a few hundred. If you can charge at 50% of Ah than you can increase range by 50%. But capability to take a fast charge seems to be a secret. Anyone know where reliable info can be obtained ? --Steve
 

Dave G.

1984 E30+ Ludington, MI
I ran a Honda 2000W generator on the foredeck
Yeah, seems like this answer to a limited electric range is why the technology wouldn't work for me. The last thing I would want to do is to stow & run gasoline engines on board. If you only day sailed electric would probably be fine 95% of the time. It's not unlike cars really. If you travel distances regularly electric is still problematic. But if you use the vehicle within a 100 or so miles of home it covers your needs 95% of the time.
 
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