Removal of shroud deck attachment on 32-3

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Now that I have a nice set of Garhauer EZ Glide genoa cars, I can't get them on the tracks because the end of the genoa track runs too close to the coaming. Removing the track would be a nightmare, so the only other solution is to remove the Navtec U-bolt shroud attachment that blocks the forward end of the track and that ties the aft shroud to the Triaxial Force Grid. Obviously this is winter project, and it seems fairly straightforward (the u-bolt is bolted through the deck, through an aluminum block which is pulled downward by a tie rod with a mushroom head at the top end and which is threaded into a large aluminum cylindrical block embedded in the TFG at the lower end). However, this is going involve removing the interior teak cover plate and accessing bolts inside the vinyl liner.

Has anyone ever done this in order to rebed the u-bolts, for example?
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Since no one apparently has performed this mantenance item, here is a response I received from Bill Houlihan via email:

"Geoff:
My headliner has zippers - if yours does not, then I think you can remove
the narrow trim wood and under you will find the headliner stapled to the
under deck.
That is the least of your worries. Once you get to the backing plate you
must pry away from the deck somehow. If there had been leaking or even
weeping, it will be almost impossible to remove. After much hammering,
etc., I finally was forced to drill a hole through the deck and use a drift
punch to bash the backing plate free. Actually should have done this
initially and saved much pounding and swearing from below.
I also had a new backing plate made as one was partially destroyed by
corrosion."
 
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ref_123

Member III
Shroud removal?

Geoff,

so you actually plan to move the shroud backward or sideways or just get rid of it?

Thanks,
Stan
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Good lord no! I am having the mast out this year, so I plan to try to remove and rebed the u-bolts that hold the rigging to the deck. The aft shroud u-bolt blocks the forward end of the genoa track, so removing the bolt will also allow me to slide the new genoa car onto the track from the forward end. The aft end of the track is blocked by proximity to the coaming. BTW, the Garhauer cars are very nice - they have ball bearings. Of course I managed to let them fall out during a moment of inattention, but I found most of them and tweezers saved the day. Garhauer is kindly sending me some more.
 

escapade

Inactive Member
shroud bedding

Geoff;
Just returned from vacation & saw this post. I did this on my 30+ a few years ago. No big deal. Did not have the problems described by the other fellow. I suspect he got into a situation where someone used 3M 5200. Great stuff except it's an ADHESIVE/sealant. I will only use that on something I NEVER plan on removing again. 4200 or polysulfide (prefered) are a much better product for bedding deck hardware. When reassembling tie-rods, snug them up & then give 1 to 2 turns preload. This should be enough to keep the deck from deflecting when you reinstall & tighten the rig. If you have any other question let me know.
Have fun & sail fast,
Bud E34 "Escapade"
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
How did you deal with the headliner? It seems that the 38's have a zipper; I don't. My tie rods are covered by a teak plate and there is a cutout slot in the vinyl behind it. I hope I can work through the slot once I remove the teak cover (like larparoscopic surgery).

PS, actually I do have a zipper.
 
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escapade

Inactive Member
chain plates

Geoff;
My 30+ & 34 have the zippers mentioned. The 30 also had teak trim around the chainplate base. If you remove the teak trim you should be able to access the nuts holding the "U" bolt that goes through the deck. I believe a 3/4" socket is what you'll need (standard nut size for 1/2 " thread). Look closely at the teak & you'll see the plugs covering the screws that hold the plates in place. Carefully remove these plugs to access the screws. I usually drill a 1/4" hole in the center of the plug and carefully use a small chisle or screwdriver to remove them. If you need extra room, you can cut the headliner. Try not to go beyond the point that can be covered w/teak plates. The trick is to be able to hide any damage you do! When rebedding, only put sealant on the deck side of the fitting. You want to seal water out, not trap it in the deck core. If there is no sealant on the inside, any leaks will show and you can repair them before they become major. Much easier to rebed than to recore an entire deck.
BTW, I have used these Garhaur cars and they are great. They are on my list for this years boat show.
Hope I've answered your questions. If not, get back to me & I'll try again!
Have fun & sail fast
Bud E34 "Escapade"
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
I understand, thanks. I remove teak plugs with a brad point drill bit the same diameter as the plug. If you take time to center the point, the plug comes out neatly.
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
After two days of labor, I have now removed 5 of the 6 u-bolts. Two of the backing blocks are fairly corroded and I plan to see if RigRite can provide me with replacements. I found that that the trick for removing the u-bolts from the deck is to put a shackle on it, slip a small crowbar through the shackle and using a 2 x 4 as a fulcrum gently coax the u-bolt out of the deck. My biggest problem was that the aluminum round bar into which the starboard main Navtec rod is threaded had corroded locking in the rod. I finally got it out without too much damage, I hope, to the threads in the aluminum, but was not able to reinsert the rod without it binding. I finally had to get a die (1/2" - 20 tpi) and recut the threads on the rod. Just to be extra safe, I plan to try to thread a 1/2" locking nut onto the back side. The sixth rod (port) is buried in the medicine cabinet. Since it seems partially frozen too, I may leave it alone as its removal would require disassembly of the cabinet.

Lesson learned is that this is definitely a maintenance project for a critical part of the boat that should be undertaken after 15 to 20 years. If you don't have time, at least spray lubricant on the area where the Navtec rod enters the aluminum round bar embedded in the TFG to minimize the chance of its freezing in place. It would also be a good idea to put a wrench on it an work it back and forth.
 
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Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Unfortunately, RigRite can replace only the two hole backing plate ($75). Because they are no longer made or otherwise available according to RigRite I have been thinking of having one made "online" from 6061 aluminum using the software provided my www.emachineshop.com. You design it yourself with its CAD software which you can download and then it is milled and anodized for you. The cost is slightly less than the price quoted by RigRite. The downside is that the eMachineshop does not seem to be able to angle the bottom of the center hole (which is necessary because the rod is angled to the centerline of the boat). The best it can do is camfer the hole.

PS eMachineshop appears not to be up to the task of the intricate design of the block, so its back to the drawing board.
 
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escapade

Inactive Member
a tip

Geoff;
Apply an "anti-seize" compound to the threads before reassembly. It will keep the threads from sticking in the aluminum & also prevent gauling of the stainless to stainless threads on the "U" bolts. This is better than grease in that it has special compounds that hold up over the long haul. It's available at most auto parts, truck parts or farm implement dealers. I'm a firm believer in putting things back together with the idea I might have to take them apart again some day. That way when I do, it's much easier than the original!
Have fun & sail fast
Bud E34 "Escapade"
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Thanks. Actually I have some and have used it on my turnbuckles, but forgot about it. However, I did apply Forespar's Lanocote which it claims prevents galling for years. I think the automotive stuff is made for high temperatures, which I don't expect (until global warming really kicks in.)
 

Sean Engle

Your Friendly Administrator
Administrator
Founder
Geoff Johnson said:
...PS eMachineshop appears not to be up to the task of the intricate design of the block, so its back to the drawing board.
So what did you end up doing about getting the number of backing plates you needed? I'm surprised that eMachineshop could not turn out something like those plates...

//sse
 

Geoff Johnson

Fellow Ericson Owner
Actually, I did produce a nice CAD drawing for everything except the center hole which has to be drilled at an angle. I suppose I could have drilled it myself, but then got lazy and concluded that the problem was relatively minor corrosion (one or two pits about 1/8" deep) affecting one aft shroud, I could get away with cleaning them out with my Dremel tool and filling them with MarineTex. Time will tell.
 
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