jib sheets 38-200

Offshore1

New Member
perhaps to much time on my hands but looking at replacing my 14 year old jib sheets on a 38-200. I've calculated total 150ft. and looking at 5/8 diameter I'm just curious what size other owners are using.
thanks
jim
Hi -

I replaced the genoa sheets on our 39B 2 years ago with the new Yale Cordage Ph.D Racer rope. It is a very light sheet and makes tacking and gybing easier. It is "sticky" on the winch drums and its bulky diameter is fuzzy and soft until loaded. I love my Genoa sheets!

1/2 inch is the largest diameter they offer (it feels much bigger) but with 13,300 lb breaking strength - it's more than strong enough!

150 feet is a lot of rope... I think I did 95 or 100 feet - on a continuous line
 

David Grimm

E38-200
Christian, I agree, the pesky bowline knots always get jamed up on something while making a tack. Anyone here use New England Ropes sta-set 1/2 inch for jib sheets? I just grabbed 120 feet of it only to find out my halyard is sta-set x ⁷/8.
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
I've got sta set 1/2 for my jib sheets on the 32-3. Might be slightly overkill but you touch those sheets a lot, and they feel solid to grab and winch. 7/8" halyard is beefy!!
 

steven

Sustaining Member
to while away the hours on dull on-line business meetings I have learned to tie an alpine butterfly loop knot without looking in under 20 seconds.
Makes a pretty no-slip loop.
 

steven

Sustaining Member
. . . and today I used it to temporarily belay the topping lift while I fix the leads to get it to a cleat.
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
I wasn't familiar with that knot, but it sure looks like a good one;

The butterfly loop, also known as lineman's loop, butterfly knot, alpine butterfly knot and lineman's rider, is a knot used to form a fixed loop in the middle of a rope. Tied in the bight, it can be made in a rope without access to either of the ends; this is a distinct advantage when working with long climbing ropes. Wikipedia
Category: Loop
Typical use: Fixed loop on the bight. Isolating a worn section of rope

 

Navman

Member III
Does anyone know the diameter for the main halyard on an E-38? The spec sheet says 3/8" but that seems small to me.
 

Navman

Member III
Thanks Dave. The spec sheet says 7/16 for the sheets but 3/8ths for the halyard. Seemed that 7/16 would be the size. I just want to make sure as I am not near the boat and I want to still be able to use the original clutches.
 

Seth

Sustaining Partner
Hi Jim-
What kind of rope are you thinking? 75' per side seems a little excessive, how did you come to that?
Chris
70 feet per side is a bit more than you need, certainly no need for 75 feet per side. 138'-140' total is about right. 5/8' is to big and heavy, 1/2" is what I would use for this boat. The factory sheets were 7/16" IIRC, but the line quality is so much improved these days I would likely go 1/2", unless you feel it is too small for your hands
 

David Grimm

E38-200
Main halyard 35-40 foot. 7/16. Sta-set x. Cruising.
 

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Dan Morehouse

Member III
Main halyard 35-40 foot. 7/16. Sta-set x. Cruising.
Hmmm. I just bought a 7/16 pre-made main halyard for my 1981 E38 from Defender, brand "Novabraid", which included a headboard shackle spliced to the line. I was a little dismayed to see the splice appeared to increase the diameter of the line to over a half inch. I had climbed my mast to measure the sheave a couple weeks ago, and the width was 9/16, and now I'm afraid the line will bind as the splice passes over the sheave near the top of the hoist. I hope I'm wrong. My current halyard is a line/cable spliced assembly which was on the boat when I bought it 13 years ago, and which I've been dying to get rid of. If the new one doesn't work, I'm going to be well & truly stuck.

Dan Morehouse
1981 E38 "Next Exit"
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
That sheave-jamming problem with the added thickness from the splice "bury" is why I chose to use a "halyard knot" to secure the line to shackles. I replaced all of our OEM wire/rope halyards about 20 years ago.
Having no splice also makes it easier to remove the halyard periodically to wash it, and then reverse it when putting it back.

The "proper" splice is stronger, but there is a price to pay. And then, modern hi tech line is so darned strong that even potentially losing some ultimate strength for a knot is not consequential when my T-900 5/16 halyards are rated at approx. 7K pounds, (Roughly equal to my SS shroud wires.)

Be sure, if you can do so, to check your masthead sheaves with various thickness of lines to see what can run thru them. I found that 3/8 was binding a bit on the masthead cheeks, and so went with the 5/16. Your sheaves are likely wider than ours.....
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Here's what my halyard splice looks like. The line is what, 7/16 Dyneema?

Looks fat, but no problem. Give it a try.

E381 Halyard.JPG
 
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